from the archive


Tag: Princeton


File it away


Did you ever wonder how librarians answered questions before the age of the Internet, when there were no computers, and Google, Wikipedia, online bookmarks, and saved files were not available at your fingertips?  All librarians had were print reference books, the circulating collection, print magazine indexes, hard copy magazines, the telephone, and each other.
How did we keep track of all those little bits of pertinent information and answers to commonly asked questions?
We had the Funny Facts File.


Happiness is a cup of joe


Coffee and I have a love affair that has been raging ever since I was a little girl, accompanying my dad to Chock Full o’Nuts on West 57th, across from Carnegie Hall. It’d be after dance lessons that we’d go for a treat. He’d have his straight up, while I had hot chocolate, waiting to discover why my father could not be parted from a steady stream of black coffee. 


The artist currently known as James McPhillips


If you have spent any time in Princeton recently you have probably seen a drawing of the musician Prince with "TON" written below it on a bumper sticker or t-shirt. This play on image/word was created by local artist and frequent library visitor James McPhillips. He currently has a solo show of this image and more "serious" art at Small World Coffee on Nassau Street.


The Gargoyles of Princeton


Did you know that Princeton University is home to many gargoyles? These grotesque, carved figures of humans or animals reside along the corners of many University buildings. Often they are found along the gutters, acting as water spouts for rain.
On Tuesday, July 10 at 2:00 pm Youth Services librarians Allison Santos and Martha Perry-Liu will lead a tour on the University campus and help you discover these gothic creatures.We plan to highlight 13 of these unusual beings and offer a brief history of each.


12th-century treasures


After leaving work recently, I took my daughter to the Princeton University Art Museum to browse the collections. Our first stop was on the lower level where we viewed the 12th-century celadon glazed stoneware called Melon ewer with lotus-flower design. It is Korean, from the Goryeo dynasty and was recently acquired by the Princeton University Art Museum. Simply put, it's gorgeous.

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