from the archive


Author: Janice Painter

Janice Painter is a technology librarian and has been Access Services Manager at Princeton Public Library since 1997. As part of the cross-departmental systems team, she builds, supports, and promotes the use of technology and new applications to engage library staff and customers in their 21st century learning and library experiences. She loves fresh, thought-provoking ideas and occasionally turning the world upside-down and inside-out.

Sounds of music


For the last three months, we’ve lived through adjusting to confinement and social distancing. In the new normal brought by New Jersey’s COVID-19 restrictions, sharing music has brought some light […]

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Growing the poet-tree


View of Autumn tree Nassau Street

Anticipating autumn’s arrival, our library’s first poet-in-residence, Dara-Lyn Shrager, recently taught some eager families about poetic forms in a weekend workshop. The purpose was to learn, have fun, and prepare […]

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Behind the scenes


Jenga block tower building

As we are nearing the grand opening of 2Reimagine, big and small details are coming together to transform your experience using our second floor. Let’s take a glimpse at some of […]

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Book buzz: families full of drama


There was gasoline to set a house on fire, a wronged wife, a dead husband and a sister in danger, with suspected crooked law enforcement agents and politicos galore, so nobody could be trusted. At this critical point in the story, my audiobook loan inconveniently expired. My book was deleted from my app's bookshelf, leaving me waiting in suspense while several people behind me with holds finished their borrowing and my turn came up again.


Windows


If you happened to look up into the second floor windows of the Library on a recent Friday evening, you'd have seen figures moving in dim light. You might have seen the figures dancing. You might have seen them hugging. You wouldn't have seen the tears. Or the boots kicked off on the floor and the heels shed. Inside, library staff bid their fond farewells to our departing Executive Director, Leslie Burger.


We need big magic now


As daylight hours shrink and the news expands our worries, perhaps we're all looking for spiritual and inspirational light more often these days. When fear's giant shadow blocks our view, we're left wondering what we have to hope for. When the unknown and the unthinkable preoccupy our minds, we yearn to invest our energy carving out safe and known refuges, gathering with cherished friends and family, and shoring up our strength with familiar beliefs, traditions and rituals. We need big magic now.


Escape the everyday


We all crave an escape from our everyday concerns and routines – some experience or adventure to energize us or tilt our perspective away from the ordinary. I recently read an account of a friend’s unusual experience early one foggy morning. As she walked alone in her yard through the mist, she “felt comforted by unseen hands.” When she returned later, as the fog lifted, she found “thousands of glittering threads, a multitude of intricate webs… a message for me created by hundreds of baby spiders.”


Gratitude and goodbyes


Our connected world can be bittersweet, with daily reminders of time passing, momentous occasions celebrated, vacations spent, meals enjoyed, companions met and partings taken. This past month, I lost a beloved teacher, Alan Cheuse. Here I want to pay a small tribute to his spirit and life's work.


Mobile pain and pleasure


Now, more than ever, I find myself in a love-hate relationship with my smartphone. I love the convenience of reading a magazine, listening to an audiobook, playing a podcast, plugging in my headphones and enjoying music, or reading an ebook from the small electronic device I carry everywhere. At the touch of a fingertip I have available the world at large, together with the smaller universe of my own personal contacts. My camera is always with me. So useful. So many possibilities. So much potential for connected burnout.


Michael Graves: an everyday treasure


Crossing Witherspoon Street from the library, the shiny blue tiled Arts Council of Princeton building beckons, a Graves design. Scattered in rooms throughout my home, there’s a small but mighty collection of beautiful everyday objects, practical to use, pleasing to view and to handle. I live with the gift of Michael Graves’ creativity every day. Not a day goes by without my taking a moment to appreciate this man’s work.


Get ready for Princeton Environmental Film Festival


Mark your calendars. The Princeton Environmental Film Festival is being held this year from March 19 through March 29. You can keep up with news about, and find official selections for, the ninth annual festival on our PEFF website and the PEFF Facebook page. Our planning committee is a real community effort, with enthused and dedicated people from all walks of Princeton life shaping an exciting series of films and presentations.


A community of readers


This month in a Kirkus Reviews interview, our readers’ services librarian, Kristin Friberg, gives her thoughts about our Princeton-centric corner of the publishing industry. We’re very pleased to see our library’s readers’ advisory services and the broader local reading community recognized as a trend-spotting mecca in one of the premier journals previewing books before their publication.


Cooking chez Dorie


"Miam-miam" is the appreciative exclamation you'll hear in Paris, as a delicious mouthful of food is consumed. To the American ear it even sounds like "yum, yum." Dorie Greenspan brings the art and craft of French cooking to life in her books as she shares recipes culled from 16 years of part-time Paris residency.


Six reasons to listen to audiobooks


Sometimes you have to listen to get it. Here’s a riddle: You are the bus driver. You drive three blocks and pick up two people. You drive three more blocks and one person gets off. You drive around the corner and pick up five people. How old is the bus driver?  Read it aloud, slowly and clearly, one time, to someone and watch the reaction of puzzlement. (If you still haven't figured it out, scroll to the bottom of the screen.)


I read (and watch) banned books


I remember the first time I heard a book was "banned." I was most likely in fifth grade, left with the librarian to keep an eye on me while I studied and did homework in my little town library on a Saturday afternoon. Stanley Kubrick’s movie, "Lolita" had been in the news over the summer. I wasn’t allowed to see it. "Not for children," my parents pronounced. I figured I’d go looking for the book at the library and see what all the hubbub was about.


Due back later


Borrowing downloadable titles to read, listen or watch from our elibrary collections is convenient, day or night, at home or on the road. Check out from your device app or your browser without visiting us in person. In fact, you loved the e-book (audiobook, album, movie) you downloaded so much that you stayed up late into the night to finish. Now you’re ready to borrow more. How do you return that title before it is due and automatically deleted from your device?


Help us win $1500 this month


June is the gateway to the summer season– a busy month of milestones and activities. Getting ready to travel? Looking for something to read or listen to on your commute or while you work out? Or do you just want to keep your mind occupied while you garden, walk the dog, or clean the house? This month we encourage you to discover our handpicked collections of e-books and audiobooks on OverDrive and help the library get more good reads /good listens at the same time by helping us win a contest. 


Remembering a librarian


Earlier this month, as 2014 was ringing in, a quiet and touching tribute to Princeton Public Library’s former special collections librarian, Terri Nelson, was published in Town Topics. You might have missed it, just like you might have missed seeing Terri, "the librarian on the bench." Library staffers found the piece to be an interesting personal testimony, and we shared it together. We hope you will, too. 


For 2014: A new e-book and audiobook collection


Changes are on the horizon in 2014 as we continue to improve our digital collections. Right after New Year’s Day, Princeton Public Library will unveil a new version of our e-book and digital audiobook library, via OverDrive®, Inc. While the library has been offering digital content to our customers since 2005 as part of the eLibraryNJ consortium, on January 2, 2014 we strike out on our own with a new PPL OverDrive collection and website. 


What are they doing in there?


On Veterans Day, Princeton Public Library was closed, but staff did not have the day off. If you walked through Hinds Plaza during the daylight hours on Monday, you may have noticed a fully occupied Community Room. What were library staff members doing while they weren’t checking out and checking in materials, cataloging and ordering for the collection, fielding questions, and helping with computers? It’s no big secret, just our annual Staff Development Day.


Lessons learned


Last week, the Princeton Public Library and Princeton Day School welcomed author Jhumpa Lahiri to Princeton as part of Lahiri’s tour to promote her new book, “The Lowland.” Onstage with friend, colleague, and fellow Pulitzer Prize winner, Jeffrey Eugenides at PDS’s McAneny Theater, the two offered an intimate evening of conversation about the book’s story and context, writing challenges and recognition.


In our neighborhood:PPL movie collection


How often do you go to a theater to see movies these days? Probably less than you did a few years ago. How many TV series do you watch episode-by-episode when they air “live?” We’re finding and consuming our film and broadcast entertainment in our own homes, or wherever we choose, at random and convenient times. Want to add to your mix of viewing options? Find out a bit more about the Princeton Public Library’s collection of over 14,000 feature films, TV series, world cinema movies, documentaries and kids’ movies.


Everybody eats


If you’ve spent time watching "Sesame Street" with a child, you probably remember the Joe Raposo song called “Everybody Eats." As the song says, eating is part of everybody’s life.  Whether you eat to live or live to eat, you might be interested in classes offered at Princeton Public Library where you can explore online offerings to enhance your appreciation of all things food and drink.


Travel companions


There's nothing I like more than to have someone read me a good story. My packing routine to go on a trip includes downloading a couple of good audiobooks so I have listening choices en route. I just got back from a quick getaway to Florida. On both legs of my flight I sat next to retired seniors who wondered what I was doing with my cell phone while the plane was in the air. I was listening to reader Jeff Woodman unfurl "The Life of Pi," Yan Martel's story of an Indian boy lost at sea.


Hot audiobooks from OneClickDigital


Listening to books just keeps getting better. I always have at least one audiobook in progress on my “reading shelf.” Recently I’ve started borrowing audiobooks from Princeton Public Library’s OneClickDigital collection. No more shuffling CD discs in the car stereo; my phone holds my audiobooks. They travel where I go and OneClick’s new iOS, Android, and Kindle apps make it easy to play them whenever I have a moment to listen.


Be the change: TEDxYouth


Ask a teenager, “What is your unique vision for the future?” It’s no surprise that local teens have answers to this question and want to share their thoughts, dreams, and plans with the community. As part of Princeton Public Library’s TEDxYouth event, “Imagine the Future,” on November 16, we have eight teens presenting talks about their passions and showcasing their visions for how their generation can change the world for the better.

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